Marvel Transformers Crossovers Wolverine Review by Hasbro

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I am Wolverine Bub

 

Wolverine’s first intended origin

Despite suggestions that co-creator Len Wein originally intended for Logan to be a mutated wolverine cub, evolved to humanoid form by the High Evolutionary,[16] Wein denies this:

While I readily admit that my original idea was for Wolvie’s claws to extend from the backs of his gloves … I absolutely did not ever intend to make Logan a mutated wolverine. I write stories about human beings, not evolved animals (with apologies for any story I may have written that involved the High Evolutionary). The mutated wolverine thing came about long after I was no longer involved with the book. I’m not certain if the idea was first suggested by Chris Claremont, the late, much-missed Dave Cockrum, or John Byrne when he came aboard as artist, but it most certainly did not start with me.[17]

Wein has stated in a conversation with Stan Lee included on the X-Men Origins: Wolverine blu-ray special features that he has read “Ten things you did not know about Wolverine,” which states that he was originally intended to be a mutated wolverine cub, and this re-kindled Wein’s frustration. He again stated that he had “always known that Wolverine was a mutant.”[citation needed]

In X-Men #98 (April 1976), a biological analysis of Wolverine suggests that he was in some way different from the other X-Men, and in X-Men #103, Wolverine says he does not believe in leprechauns, to which the leprechaun replies, “Maybe leprechauns don’t believe in talkin’ wolverines, either.”[18]

In an article about the evolution of Wolverine included in a 1986 reprint of The Incredible Hulk #180-181, titled Incredible Hulk and Wolverine, Cockrum is quoted as saying that he considered having the High Evolutionary play a vital role in making Wolverine a human.[2] Writer Wein wanted Wolverine to be the age of a young adult, with superhuman strength and agility similar to Spider-Man. This changed when Wein saw Cockrum’s drawing of the unmasked Wolverine as a hairy 40-year-old.[2] Wein originally intended the claws to be retractable and part of Wolverine’s gloves, and both gloves and claws would be made of adamantium.[17] Chris Claremont eventually revealed that they were an integrated part of Wolverine’s anatomy in X-Men #98 (April 1976). Writer Jeph Loeb used a similar origin for Wolverine in the Marvel continuity, having feral mutants be an evolved lifeform.[19]

[edit]Wolverine’s second intended origin

John Byrne said in interviews and on his website that he drew a possible face for Wolverine, but then learned that John Romita, Sr., had already drawn one that Dave Cockrum used in X-Men #98 (April 1976), long before Byrne’s run on the series.[20][21] Later, Byrne used the drawing for the face of Sabretooth, an enemy of the martial artist superhero Iron Fist, whose stories Chris Claremont was writing. Byrne then had the idea of Sabretooth being Wolverine’s father.[22][23]Together, Byrne and Claremont came up with Wolverine being approximately 60 years old and having served in World War II after escaping from Sabretooth, who was approximately 120 years old.[22] The plan had been for Wolverine to have been almost crushed in an accident; he would discover, when attempting to stand for the first time after recovering, that his healing factor does not work on bones, and his legs immediately break. He then spends over a decade in a hospital bed, almost going mad, when the Canadian government approaches him with the idea of replacing his skeleton one bone at a time with adamantium, the claws being a surprise. This origin, too, was never used.

wikipedia

voice Wolverine

Neil Ross (Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends and Pryde of the X-Men)

Cal Dodd (X-Men the animated Series 1992)

Scott Mcneil (X-Men Evolution)

Steve Blum (Wolverine and the X-Men also Current Wolverine)

Hugh Jackman (X-Men films)

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